Overview Ireland



The Report Card 11 results for Ireland include:

10th place overall for child well-being among the 29 OECD countries. The first decade of the 2000s saw a halving of low family affluence and an increase in the number of children participating in further education. 86% of children in Ireland are happy with their lives.

  • Ireland has a relatively low child poverty rate of 8.5% but those who do fall below the poverty line fall harder than in other countries, giving Ireland one of the largest child poverty gaps.
  • Significant decline in children smoking and more modest declines in drinking and teenage pregnancies.
  • Ireland has the highest rate of children exercising with almost 1 in 3 children exercising for at least an hour a day. 70% of children eat breakfast every day.
  • A rise in the number of children who are overweight puts Ireland ahead of the UK, Germany and France. Over 15% of children in Ireland are overweight by BMI.
  • The number of 15-19 year olds not in education, employment or training puts Ireland at bottom of table.
  • One of only 5 countries to experience an increase bullying during the 2000s. One quarter of children would not label classmates as being kind.
  • Children in Ireland find it easiest to talk to their mothers (83%) followed by fathers (68%).

The PDF download selects only the Irish data from the Report Card and is designed to complement the full Report which can be downloaded here http://devinfolive.info/innocentichildwellbeing

Report Card 11 - Child well-being in rich countries: a comparative overview. Ireland.

UNICEF_RC11_Summary_Booklet_A4.pdf

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Globally, Report Card 11 shows a decade of progress with the Netherlands retaining its position at number one, followed by four more Nordic countries - Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The report does not show a strong relationship between per capita GDP and overall child well-being.

The full Report Card is available to download here